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Onboard air in spare tire location?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ExpoCrawler View Post
    Tanks don't make much difference for filling tires, especially large ones. They're more for air tools and such. As long as it's 100% duty cycle it'll be fine. I didn't realize they made a portable version, just switched my ARB order to the extreme outback since I need a temp solution for a big AK trip this fall. So thanks Jim!
    LOL, you’re welcome! I keep telling my wife that every once in a while I say something useful, and now I have proof!

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    • #17
      Definitely is a good option being portable (although with the tank it would be nice to throw some train horns in the truck so when a Prius decides to cut you off when you are pulling a horse trailer you can give em more than the finger...).

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ffejer78 View Post
        Definitely is a good option being portable (although with the tank it would be nice to throw some train horns in the truck so when a Prius decides to cut you off when you are pulling a horse trailer you can give em more than the finger...).
        I saw a Prospector a couple months ago with a train horn in the spare tire location. He looked more mall crawler than horse trailer if I'm honest

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        • #19
          I get it. My family has a horse ranch and I guess I’m sick of people cutting me off when pulling. If i could mount a water balloon launcher on my truck when I tow I would take that too!

          The good news about not having a tank is no worry of condensation in the tank.

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          • #20
            Did a simple mod in preparation of the compressor arriving. I hate alligator clips, and like idiot-proofing things (because I'm an idiot). Since the Extreme Outback compressor comes with an Anderson connector, I ordered a short set of leads to connect an Anderson connector to the battery, and another longer lead with Anderson connectors on both ends. This means the compressor will be plug-and-play. I'll then use the cable that comes with the compressor as jumper cables (though I may replace since they're only 4 gauge) eliminating 1 opportunity for incorrect hookup. It would be a cooler to use a longer cable routed down to the bumper, eliminating need to open the hood, but I wasn't quite comfortable with having unfused power accesable to the world.
            Attached Files

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            • #21
              Originally posted by ExpoCrawler View Post
              Did a simple mod in preparation of the compressor arriving. I hate alligator clips, and like idiot-proofing things (because I'm an idiot). Since the Extreme Outback compressor comes with an Anderson connector, I ordered a short set of leads to connect an Anderson connector to the battery, and another longer lead with Anderson connectors on both ends. This means the compressor will be plug-and-play. I'll then use the cable that comes with the compressor as jumper cables (though I may replace since they're only 4 gauge) eliminating 1 opportunity for incorrect hookup. It would be a cooler to use a longer cable routed down to the bumper, eliminating need to open the hood, but I wasn't quite comfortable with having unfused power accesable to the world.
              That is a nice set-up! I didn't know it came with the Anderson connector. You're right about the longer cable being nice and I have to wonder how often the "rest of the world" would have an Anderson connector? I get it though, sadly its a valid concern.

              No train horns for me, though it would certainly blow many Prius's and Tesla's off the road!

              I also agree with ffejer78, that no tank = no condensation and therefore less maintenance. I was concerned about that and conveniently accessing the tank purge valve.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ExpoCrawler View Post
                Did a simple mod in preparation of the compressor arriving. I hate alligator clips, and like idiot-proofing things (because I'm an idiot). Since the Extreme Outback compressor comes with an Anderson connector, I ordered a short set of leads to connect an Anderson connector to the battery, and another longer lead with Anderson connectors on both ends. This means the compressor will be plug-and-play. I'll then use the cable that comes with the compressor as jumper cables (though I may replace since they're only 4 gauge) eliminating 1 opportunity for incorrect hookup. It would be a cooler to use a longer cable routed down to the bumper, eliminating need to open the hood, but I wasn't quite comfortable with having unfused power accesable to the world.
                This is genius. Is there some reason not to just insert a fuse or circuit breaker into the line?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JimInHB View Post
                  This is genius. Is there some reason not to just insert a fuse or circuit breaker into the line?
                  I imagine you could for the compressor if you looked up the max current draw (probably 40 amps or something) but I don't think you can get a big enough fuse for jump starting. I'm no expert though...

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                  • #24
                    Update: Bad News, my compressor came in today, and it has the smaller 50A Anderson plugs, not the big 175A plugs I got for my cables. So I'll have to swap the connector. As a side note, this compressor is MASSIVE compared to the ARB dual compressor in our Jeep. Tempted to have an air-up race.

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                    • #25
                      Got the connectors swapped and ran an experiment:

                      I aired both front tires down to 13 psi, and let each compressor run on 1 tire for 5 minutes. Not perfectly scientific as they had different hoses, but both tires were at 39 psi after 5 minutes, so I'd say they're pretty equivalent.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by ExpoCrawler View Post
                        Got the connectors swapped and ran an experiment:

                        I aired both front tires down to 13 psi, and let each compressor run on 1 tire for 5 minutes. Not perfectly scientific as they had different hoses, but both tires were at 39 psi after 5 minutes, so I'd say they're pretty equivalent.
                        Useful info - will you wheel it at 13? I'm curious how low we can safely go without bead locks, I'm hesitant to drop much below 18-20 given the weight of the truck, but perhaps I'm overly paranoid about this. (Blowing a bead out in the middle of nowhere is a bundle of fun I'd rather avoid...)

                        I did get some very helpful info from George at Extreme Outback yesterday - I wanted to use an inflator with a gauge, which is usually if not always/necessarily closed rather than open, and asked George if this was possible and if so what he recommended. He said it's no problem, and sold me a T connector and blow off valve to insert between the heat dissipation hose and the coil hose and this will allow me to use my inflator! The two are currently on their way to me and I'll let you know how it goes when I hook it up.

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                        • #27
                          I was about 14 when I ran Chinamans Gulch, no issues. I've been below 10 in the snow, probably wouldn't try that rock crawling. Good to hear about the gauge solution, I was a little bummed to discover the compressor has no switch, no pressure cutoff, and runs full blast till you cut power.

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